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Read Why Are Kittens So Expensive for a different (but similar) perspective.

The "Price" of adoption

Kittens are priceless.
but they are not free

You should expect to pay between $400 and $700 to adopt a "pet" quality Maine Coon kitten, perhaps more (especially for show quality), possibly less for an older cat.
"But", you say, "that much for a cat? I can get a cat at the SPCA for a $25 donation. I understand there are some purebreds in shelters, they just don't have papers..."

That's true. If that's what you want, go ahead. You may save a life. But if you continue in your quest for a purebred pedigreed Maine Coon, you'll need to start by giving up a common misperception.

You are not buying a cat

That $600 check you write is paying the breeder (a partial payment at that) for many things, including:

  • time spent understanding what it means to be a Maine Coon

  • time spent learning the finer points of the breed

  • buying several cats to show as alters

  • cat food, kitty litter, toys

  • scratching posts

  • vaccinations for the adult cats in the household

  • costs of attending shows, getting to be known, gaining a good reputation

  • cat carriers, benching cages, cat trees

  • learning about breeding

  • several years of learning what it means to breed cats

  • learning about genetics and heredity

  • pedigree research and planning, outcross planning

  • choosing the sire and dam

  • cat food, kitty litter, toys

  • HCM screening, hip screening

  • buying a breeding female

  • ensuring that the mother-to-be isn't bred too soon or too often or to the wrong male

  • setting up a kitten nursery

  • cleaning and scrubbing with cat-safe products

  • installing screen doors inside your home, e.g. on the kitty bedroom

  • installing extra strong screens, screen-porch, etc, for light and air

  • cat food, kitty litter, toys

  • vet visits - annual or semi-annual

  • 9 weeks of care for the pregnant female, incl. pre-natal vet visits

  • assisting mama at delivery time

  • possible unforeseen circumstances of delivery

  • 12 weeks of care for the kittens

  • cat food, kitty litter, toys

  • daily handling and SOCIALIZATION of the kittens

  • scratching posts

  • The first three rounds of vaccinations

  • possibly spay/neuter of the kittens

  • cat food, kitty litter, toys

  • interviewing prospective pet parents

I also know of at least two breeders who got a DVM degree so they could better serve their cats.
Do you have any idea what getting a DVM costs?